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Snowy owl today at the beach updated, video added

So while we wait for winter to be over,so we can go whale watching. Here are a few Snowy Owl photos and videos I took this week. 

The regal snowy owl is the largest owl in North America and when in New Jersey, is often seen perched high on the roof tops. In their native habitat, these owls feed primarily on small rodents the size of hamsters called lemmings. Here in New Jersey, they feed on prey like mice, rabbits, ducks and gulls.They are scanning the beach front looking for a meal.

Please stay 50 yards away at least as they are easily spoke and often tired from thier migration from the bitter cold Arctic winters! I see them about every 4 years so enjoy them while you can. I had a great day looking for a snowy owl, along the beach. A beautiful sunny Monday, searching for the snowy owl. 

#NotesFromOurNaturalists - Snowy Owls (Bubo scandiacus) As winter rages, so does the anticipation of seeing the majestic snowy owl in New Jersey. Native to the artic tundra, snowy owls can migrate south for thousands of miles during the winter months in search of food. The typical winter migration area for snowy owls is along the southern border of Canada. Irruptions, or sharp population increases, of snowy owls in areas outside of southern Canada are usually seen in only a few northern states on the East or West Coast. New Jersey is lucky enough to be one of those states. The regal snowy owl is the largest owl in North America and when in New Jersey, is often seen perched high on the crest of the dunes. In their native habitat, these owls feed primarily on small rodents the size of hamsters called lemmings. Here in New Jersey, they feed on prey like mice, rabbits, ducks and gulls. They are known for their bright yellow eyes and pristine white coats. Adult males are usually all white while females have dark brown/black markings. It is well known that snowy swls are primarily nocturnal, as undisturbed owls rarely move during the daytime. Most of the time, if they are observed flying from one location to another, it is a response to pressure and/or harassment. In New Jersey, the only real threat to these animals is humans! Snowy Owls are highly sought after by birdwatchers, photographers and nature-lovers alike. - Please do not enter the dunes to photograph or observe the birds. The dunes are critical to the survival of our coastal ecosystems and are very sensitive to foot traffic. - Please do not approach the birds. - Please be courteous of other visitors. - Please share your photos! Bring your family to the park this off-season and see if you can catch a glimpse of the stunning and rare snowy owl.

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